Jacob Druckman: Lamia
BMOP/sound
1029
August 2013
Disc 1: 56:24
  • Boston Modern Orchestra Project
  • Gil Rose, conductor

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CD price: 16.99

Track listing

Disc 1 
1.That Quickening Pulse
2.Delizie Contente che l'Alme Beate
3.Nor Spell Nor Charm
 Suite from Médée
4.I. Ouverture
5.II. Prélude
6.III. Rondeau pour les Corinthiens
7.IV. Loure
8.V. Passepied & Choeur
 Lamia
9.I. Folk conjuration to make one courageous
10.II. Metamorphoses, Book VII; Folk conjuration to dream of one's future husband
11.III. Folk conjuration against death or other absence of the soul
12.IV. Stanza degli Incanti de Medea; Tristan und Isolde; Periapt against theeves

News and Press

[CD Review] La Folia reviews Jacob Druckman: Lamia

In this program’s balance of modern alongside old, we learn that Druckman knows how to manage foreground and background. Druckman was also alert to his place in history. It instills his music with confidence. In the notes, La Folia contributor Dan Albertson identifies similarities to Lutosławski’s orchestration and language. Dutilleux, another master of transparency across multiple layers, came to mind. That Quickening Pulse provides a feisty concert opener with dissonant fanfares.

La Folia Full review
[CD Review] Jacob Druckman: Lamia by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project

This recording by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project captures several of Jacob Druckman (1928-1996)’s later works. While his Lamia, performed here by soprano Lucy Shelton, headlines the disc, the recording is structured as an all-Druckman concert that succeeds with aplomb. Mixing Druckman’s original works with arrangements of baroque pieces by Cavalli and Charpentier, the performance opens with That Quickening Pulse in its rightful place as a concert-opener.

I Care If You Listen Full review
[CD Review] BMOP Plays Druckman

In the early 90s, I sang a small role in Jacob Druckman’s opera Medea in the Juilliard Opera Center’s semi-staged production of it. I was struck by its synthesis of old and new, and demanding yet felicitous writing for the voice. Later I worked with Druckman at the Aspen Music Festival and saw him again in a masterclass at Boston University. At the latter he seemed unwell, but retained his charisma and sense of humor. Little did I know that he was terminally ill with cancer; he passed away some months later. Although my contacts with Druckman were brief, I miss him.

Sequenza 21 Full review
[CD Review] The Arts Fuse on Druckman: Lamia

Jacob Druckman (1928-1996) was one of greatest orchestral composers – if not the finest – of the 20th century. Though his music adhered to a sometimes-difficult aesthetic, Druckman, like his great contemporary, György Ligeti, had such a command of instrumentation that he could simply draw in listeners through the engaging peculiarity of his sound world. That reality is demonstrated powerfully in BMOP’s new album, Lamia, which documents music Druckman composed or arranged over the last decade of his life.

The Arts Fuse Full review
[CD Review] Druckman: Lamia - Great overview of some of the last works of this important American composer

The music of Jacob Druckman has always fascinated me. I first became familiar with this Julliard-trained composer with his Chiaroscuro and I was immediately hooked. Druckman, who also taught at Yale University for many years, was a composer who had a gift for colorful orchestration, interesting but non-strident harmonies and some fascinating treatments of counterpoint.

Audiophile Audition Full review