With hammer and feather BMOP goes percussive

The Boston Modern Orchestra Project has been all over the news for the promise of hearing the Boston premiere of the near-original version of George Antheil’s Ballet mécanique, which it delivered under the direction of Gil Rose at Jordan Hall on Friday the Thirteenth. About that more later, but the real story of this concert was the variety of sound and expression of which percussion ensembles are capable.

Media Date 
November 15, 2009
Media Source 
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
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As satisfying and revelatory as a whole as its parts were individually distinguished.

Media Contact Name 
Vance R. Koven

Big Bang: music of Antheil, Varèse, and Harrison

This performance earns a near perfect score for the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP) It’s not often that we hear George Antheil’s notorious Ballet Mécanique, partly because it is scored for sixteen synchronized player pianos. Back when Antheil wrote it, there was no way these speedy automatons could be synchronized; but now, in the electronic age, they can be. And they were. While this performance featured only eight player pianos, they effectively produced the intense sound Antheil could only dream about.

Media Date 
November 13, 2009
Media Source 
Stylus
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Media Quote 

This performance earns a near perfect score for the BMOP.

Media Contact Name 
Martin Chuzzlewit

Classical Music Review: Boston Modern Orchestra Project

The Jordan Hall stage was crammed full of seventy players for the season’s final concert by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP) on May 28. Under its artistic director Gil Rose, we heard music by five composers, the earliest dating from 1989. For two works the distinguished baritone Sanford Sylvan (b. 1953) was the soloist.

Media Date 
June 1, 2010
Media Source 
The Arts Fuse
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Media Quote 

This music by a real master was the most impressive work on the BMOP's program and was gloriously performed.

Media Contact Name 
Caldwell Titcomb

BMOP proves that new music can be moving

On Friday, May 28, in Jordan Hall, the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, a.k.a. BMOP, presented its last concert of the season -— five works composed in the past 25 years, two of which featured the great baritone Sanford Sylvan. BMOP’s past season had featured concerts showcasing groups within the orchestra (strings in “Strings Attached,” percussion and keyboards in the “Big Bang” concert, winds in “Band in Boston”). For this concert, deploying the full orchestra, BMOP presented works by four living composers, all in attendance, and Orchestra Piece by Leon Kirchner, who died last fall.

Media Date 
May 29, 2010
Media Source 
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
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Media Quote 

I repeatedly thought how I'd like to hear each piece again.

Media Contact Name 
Susan Miron

Stylus reviews Full Score

The Boston Modern Orchestra Project commissions, performs, and records music of the twentieth and twenty first centuries exclusively, allowing listeners to hear full-sized orchestral performances of modern compositions, previously performed more typically by small groups like the Kronos Quartet and the Chameleon Arts Ensemble.

Media Date 
May 28, 2010
Media Source 
Stylus
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Media Quote 

Dynamic, engaging, exciting and challenging—the kind of performance Boston deserves and needs.

Media Contact Name 
Carolyn Gregory

What's new

The timely highlight of Gil Rose’s latest BMOP (Boston Modern Orchestra Project) concert, “Strings Attached,” was a new/old piece (2004, revised 2009) for two string orchestras by Scott Wheeler now called Crazy Weather — the new title taken from a John Ashbery poem that begins, “It’s this crazy weather we’ve been having.” Thunderous snaps of antiphonal bass strings set off pizzicato raindrops that turn into Allegro sheets of musical rain. Of course, it’s an emotional landscape, as the exquisite Adagio makes even clearer.

Media Date 
March 23, 2010
Media Source 
The Boston Phoenix
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Media Quote 

Slowly overlapping high violins create pungent harmonies, with delicate pizzicato punctuation.

Media Contact Name 
Lloyd Schwartz

The hidden life of strings

The string section is a staple of any orchestra: The largest of the instrumental sections, the strings are the most prominently displayed. Strings are usually the most constant factor in any orchestral score, while woodwinds, brass, percussion are the variables. Perhaps it is ironic that the fate of the string section is to play some of the least sonically interesting parts. Strings are often consigned to betraying their vast range of timbre and tone color to complement and support more strident colors of other sections of the orchestra.

Media Date 
March 19, 2010
Media Source 
The Tech
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Media Quote 

Striking in its ability to perform so many roles as a single ensemble, BMOP's performance left the audience in a stunned silence that broke into violent applause.

String theory

I was feeling a little, well, strung out this weekend (having seen both Itzhak Perlman and the Artemis String Quartet), so perhaps I simply wasn’t in the mood for “Strings Attached,” the latest concert by the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (last Saturday at Jordan Hall). Or then again, maybe the concert was simply as mixed a bag as it seemed. At any rate, it proved a rather rambling evening, with perhaps no very deep lows, but only one real high.

Media Date 
March 10, 2010
Media Source 
The Hub Review
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Media Quote 

A strangely moving mix of wail and chant, the piece is a richly embroidered work indeed and Kashkashian made an electric connection with the audience.

Media Contact Name 
Thomas Garvey

Strung out: BMOP's "Strings Attached"

As the BMOP nears the close of its season, Boston lowbrow was treated to—in keeping with the “instrumental” theme of their programming this year—a concert of string music with the paronomastic title “Strings Attached.” Saturday night started with Stained Glass (2009), a brand new short and accessible piece by NEC grad student Nathan Ball—a smooth start to the night with its passages of shuddering violins and folky vibrato.

Media Date 
March 9, 2010
Media Source 
Boston lowbrow
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Media Quote 

BMOP loves to bring those oft ignored or overpowered instruments to the front of the orchestra.

Media Contact Name 
Bryce Lambert

For Modern Orchestra, strings tie it all together

It was probably the touchy economy, in part, that inspired Gil Rose and the Boston Modern Orchestra Project to build concerts this season around subsections of the orchestra rather than the full group; on Saturday, it was works for strings. And the orchestra’s most homogeneous group, its lyricism and opulence self-reinforcing, made for pretty classy thrift.

Media Date 
March 9, 2010
Media Source 
The Boston Globe
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Media Quote 

It's a high-performance vehicle for a soloist and ensemble that can (and did) sustain its intensity.

Media Contact Name 
David Weininger

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