Bolcom, BMOP, and the graceful ghost of Ligeti

I’m late with my thoughts on the Boston Modern Orchestra Project‘s “Bolcom with BMOP” evening last Sunday. Which may have something to do with the fact that I was slightly, but not entirely, disappointed by the program. I was drawn to the concert because I’m a fan of its eponymous star, the distinguished American composer William Bolcom - or at least I’m a huge fan (like many people) of his piano and vocal music (a favorite selection, “The Poltergeist,” above).

Media Date 
March 12, 2011
Media Source 
The Hub
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Quote 

The upshot of the piece seemed to be that every musical style was in effect a kind of harlequin, and the whole of musical history therefore, yes, merely a commedia.

Media Contact Name 
Thomas Garvey

Not at all Monsters of Modernism

Gil Rose, who has included Tufts University as one of the bases of his Boston Modern Orchestra Project, brought a group of nineteen of Boston’s best freelancers to Distler Hall on Sunday afternoon, January 30, for a program of vivid (and not at all monstrous) American works for small orchestra and chamber groups. BMOP gave the same program at Bowdoin College and Wellesley College before this well-seasoned wrap-up. The audience was smaller than it ought to have been, but the weather was certainly much to blame for that.

Media Date 
February 2, 2011
Media Source 
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Quote 

BMOP once again shows itself at the forefront of new music activities not only on Boston, but in America generally.

Media Contact Name 
Mark DeVoto

Professor Brody's "monsters" scare some but inspire many

Were music a liquid, the music performed in the “Monsters of Modernism” concert would be a steaming mug of black coffee. And don’t even think of asking for milk and sugar. Boston Modern Orchestra Project’s Jan. 29 concert, led by conductor Gil Rose, turned heads with its unconventional music. The composers were “uncompromising,” Rose said. “They wrote the music that they believed in,” regardless of what the popular norms were. Among the contemporary composers featured was Wellesley Music Professor Martin Brody.

Media Date 
February 2, 2011
Media Source 
The Wellesley News
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Quote 

One thing is certain and that is that BMOP gives an outstanding performance.

Media Contact Name 
Stephanie Gall

A double dose of BMOP

For classical music nerds, the term ‘Double Concerto’ might likely bring to mind Vivaldi’s many works for pairs of violins or other instruments, or for the more romantically-inclined, Brahms’ Double Concerto for violin and cello. But there are many examples in the 20th and 21st centuries as well, for all kinds of instrument combinations. Last Friday night, the Boston Modern Orchestra Project gave a diverse sampling of the genre entitled Double Trouble, featuring four works composed between 1938 and 2010.

Media Date 
January 28, 2011
Media Source 
Miss Music Nerd
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Quote 

I really need to put Tippett on my to-listen list now.

BMOP tackles double concertos with trouble

The double concerto, pace Brahms, is a creature of the Baroque era, really a special version of the concerto grosso with a concertino of only a couple of players blending with and emerging from the ripieno. The restructuring of large-scale composition around sonata form deprived composers of the natural recurrences of melodic strands that fueled the concerto grosso, making solo concertos a more logical way to achieve timbral contrast within the continual-development process of the more modern forms; yet, some Classical-era composers could not let go.

Media Date 
January 25, 2011
Media Source 
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
Media 
Media Quote 

Everson and Berlin performed brilliantly, with golden tone and pure lines; the orchestra was sonically radiant.

Media Contact Name 
Vance R. Koven

Fuse Classical reviews BMOP's "Virtuosity’s Velocity"

The Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP) kicked off its season with a Jordan Hall program on November 13. Entitled “Virtuosity’s Velocity,” the concert was devoted to five American works for chamber orchestra. The music was demanding and difficult, but conductor Gil Rose did indeed elicit plenty of virtuosity from his ensemble.

Media Date 
November 20, 2010
Media Source 
The Arts Fuse
Media 
Media Quote 

The music was demanding and difficult, but conductor Gil Rose did indeed elicit plenty of virtuosity from his ensemble.

Media Contact Name 
Caldwell Titcomb

Vigorous BMOP romps through Adams symphonies and more

For its season-opening concert, “Virtuosity’s Velocity,” the Boston Modern Orchestra Project trained its sights on the chamber orchestra — an ensemble whose unique flexibility can incorporate the weight and timbral range of the orchestra and the responsiveness of chamber music. All the music was American, creating a sort of microhistory of the genre’s many iterations.

Media Date 
November 15, 2010
Media Source 
The Boston Globe
Media 
Media Quote 

This is zany, infectious, and altogether fun music.

Media Contact Name 
David Weininger
Media Contact Title 
Globe Staff

All-American electricity

For its seasonal opener “Virtuosity’s Velocity,” on Saturday, November 13 at Jordan Hall, the Boston Modern Orchestra Project chose to present an all-American program in a chamber-orchestra size. (In the old days, there were more players on stage than audience members.) The program included works by John Coolidge Adams, Arthur Berger, Ross Lee Finney, and Scott Wheeler. All these composers except Wheeler flirted with serial techniques, only to abandon them later.

Media Date 
November 15, 2010
Media Source 
The Boston Musical Intelligencer
Media 
Media Quote 

The final piece was Adams's Chamber Symphony, and a wonder it was.

Media Contact Name 
Larry Phillips

BMOP has no trouble with multiple double concerti

Virtuosity, in its traditional sense, is musical performance at its most outgoing; the Boston Modern Orchestra Project’s Saturday concert — “Double Trouble,” a quartet of double concerti — revealed a plethora of extroverted strategies. The plurality of styles was a showcase for the flexibility of conductor Gil Rose’s group, switching channels with ease, burnished and rhythmically rigorous in a program marked by wide-ranging gregariousness.

Media Date 
January 24, 2011
Media Source 
The Boston Globe
Media 
Media Quote 

Virtuosity, in its traditional sense, is musical performance at its most outgoing; BMOP's Saturday concert revealed a plethora of extroverted strategies.

Media Contact Name 
Matthew Guerrieri

Women's works illuminated by Boston Modern Orchestra Project

A chamber-size contingent of the Boston Modern Orchestra Project and director Gil Rose visited Wellesley College on Saturday (part of a weekend tour that also stopped at Bowdoin College and Tufts University) with an all-female-composer program called “Luminous Noise.” Such a deliberate spotlight is, hopefully, not quite the necessary corrective to a predominantly male compositional culture that it would have been all too recently, but it still invited consideration of what it does — and does not — mean to be a female composer in the world of classical music.

Media Date 
December 13, 2010
Media Source 
The Boston Globe
Media 
Media Quote 

Rose and the players, perpetuating BMOP's high, accomplished standard, were particularly good in this pair, mixing easy virtuosity with bracing charm.

Media Contact Name 
Matthew Guerrieri
Media Contact Title 
Globe Staff

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Concert Review