Fanfare Magazine on Rosenblum: Möbius Loop

Fanfare readers have met Mathew Rosenblum in reviews by Robert Kirzinger in 23:5 and Robert Carl, who covered a New World disc of several works about a year ago, in 36:3. Both of my colleagues liked his music a great deal, and so do I. Rosenblum has forged a unique compositional voice, in part from the tuning and temperament that he employs in his music. The 21-tone and 19-tone scales that permit intervals in just intonation are among the tools in his toolbox.

Media Date 
March 15, 2014
Media Source 
Fanfare Magazine
Media 
Media Quote 

Anyone curious about the level of virtuosity attainable on the baritone saxophone only needs to listen to this work.

Media Contact Name 
David DeBoor Canfield

The Mind-Bending, Ear-Opening Music of Mathew Rosenblum

"Möbius Loop" is an apt enough title for composer Mathew Rosenblum's new record from the Boston Modern Orchestra Project (BMOP). Like that topological construct, the album's titular concerto for the Raschèr Saxophone Quartet, presented here in versions with and without orchestral accompaniment, is both a mind-bending illusion and an elegant feat of mathematics – and so, for that matter, is every other composition on this disc.

Media Date 
December 16, 2013
Media Source 
WQXR
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Daniel Stephen Johnson

Fanfare Magazine on Berger: Words for Music, Perhaps

As a graduate student I remember Arthur Berger's music being described in the halls as "white-note Webern." In fact, as Rodney Lister's notes clarify for me, it was Milton Babbitt, who, in a 1950 article, described the music as "diatonic Webern," a moniker that apparently stuck the same way to Berger as the notorious "Who Cares If You Listen?" stuck to Babbitt (incidentally not that composer's title).

Media Date 
March 1, 2014
Media Source 
Fanfare Magazine
Media 
Media Quote 

The performances, that for this sort of music can sometimes be dry, are instead over the top in their abandon and delight in the intricacies of the works.

Media Contact Name 
Robert Carl

Druckman: Lamia - Great overview of some of the last works of this important American composer

The music of Jacob Druckman has always fascinated me. I first became familiar with this Julliard-trained composer with his Chiaroscuro and I was immediately hooked. Druckman, who also taught at Yale University for many years, was a composer who had a gift for colorful orchestration, interesting but non-strident harmonies and some fascinating treatments of counterpoint.

Media Date 
September 15, 2013
Media Source 
Audiophile Audition
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Daniel Coombs

The Arts Fuse on Druckman: Lamia

Jacob Druckman (1928-1996) was one of greatest orchestral composers – if not the finest – of the 20th century. Though his music adhered to a sometimes-difficult aesthetic, Druckman, like his great contemporary, György Ligeti, had such a command of instrumentation that he could simply draw in listeners through the engaging peculiarity of his sound world. That reality is demonstrated powerfully in BMOP’s new album, Lamia, which documents music Druckman composed or arranged over the last decade of his life.

Media Date 
September 25, 2013
Media Source 
The Arts Fuse
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Quote 

The ease with which this orchestra jumps about, stylistically, in contemporary repertoire is simply astonishing.

Media Contact Name 
Jonathan Blumhofer

BMOP Plays Druckman

In the early 90s, I sang a small role in Jacob Druckman’s opera Medea in the Juilliard Opera Center’s semi-staged production of it. I was struck by its synthesis of old and new, and demanding yet felicitous writing for the voice. Later I worked with Druckman at the Aspen Music Festival and saw him again in a masterclass at Boston University. At the latter he seemed unwell, but retained his charisma and sense of humor. Little did I know that he was terminally ill with cancer; he passed away some months later. Although my contacts with Druckman were brief, I miss him.

Media Date 
December 18, 2013
Media Source 
Sequenza 21
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Christian Carey

Q2 Music Album of the Week: Michael Gandolfi Gives ‘Underdog’ Instruments Their Day on BMOP Album

Anybody who even heard the title of Michael Gandolfi's first album with Gil Rose's Boston Modern Orchestra Project, "Y2K Compliant," should already have noticed that he is a composer of genuine wit. The actual music was no disappointment: Gandolfi has a knack for deploying a lucid, ear-pleasing technique in the service of high-concept forms.

Media Date 
September 10, 2013
Media Source 
WQXR
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Daniel Stephen Johnson

These unique, cutting edge concertos are rather "groovy!"

Michael Gandolfi is one of our most unique, visionary contemporary composers. His music cuts across all manner of styles and influences, from jazz and rock to works intended for a children’s audience, such as his Pinocchio’s Adventures in Funland. Galdolfi’s music has been played by many of the country’s major symphony orchestras and audiences have consistently appreciated the approachable and eclectic nature of his work.

Media Date 
September 21, 2013
Media Source 
Audiophile Audition
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Daniel Coombs

La Folia on "Institutes of Groove"

These three Gandolfi concertos spotlight less familiar instruments: bass trombone, bassoon and alto-saxophone. The orchestra responds quickly with glittering colors with little introspection in these briskly moving, extroverted essays. Gandolfi dabbles with popular styles: Jazz/rock explicitly for the

Media Date 
January 15, 2014
Media Source 
La Folia
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Grant Chu Covell

Arthur Berger: Words for Music, Perhaps on BMOP/sound

History is a relentless homogenizer. What begins life as a blooming, buzzing confusion, continuously evolving in manifold and unpredictable directions, once passed through the coarse sieve of history, becomes calcified, reified, downgraded from a vital, animate organism into an abject fossil. Time as one part petrification, one part putrefaction. Take the great late Renaissance polyphonists, Lassus, Palestrina, and Victoria.

Media Date 
December 11, 2013
Media Source 
I Care If You Listen
Media Location 
Boston, MA
Media 
Media Contact Name 
Matt Mendez

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